Use one of these tricks to save money and avoid another trip to the store. Pour the tomato mixture into a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Fill a blender jar with the tomato chunks and blend until the tomatoes have all reduced into a sauce. Tomato paste is often used in very small amounts, so you may have made too much. For the best quality, use the paste within a year. Let it simmer and stir it constantly until it is reduced by half. To avoid splatters all over your kitchen, use a splatter screen on top of your pan. If you don't have either option, reduce the heat so the sauce doesn't bubble as much and be patient because it will take a little longer to reduce. Once it has cooled, transfer your tomato paste to freezer jars or another freezer-safe container. The average small can of tomato paste is 6 ounces, so make adjustments to fit your recipe. If you don't have one, a fine-mesh strainer may work if it's large enough to cover the pan. Blend a 14.5-ounce can of tomatoes in a blender or food processor until smooth. This can be a messy process because the sauce will bubble. Start with plain (unseasoned) tomato sauce if possible. Pour this puree into a pan and heat it on the stove using the same method suggested for tomato sauce. Cook the tomatoes down to a soft paste in the pan for 10 minutes. Use a splatter screen to avoid a mess from the bubbling as the mixture thickens. Purée the canned tomatoes and only use half of the can, cooking for 7 to 10 minutes until reduced. Continue cooking, stirring constantly, for about 10 minutes, until thickened and reduced by about two-thirds. You should have about 3 ounces of tomato paste from an 8-ounce can. Simmer, stirring constantly, for about 7 minutes, or until reduced by about two-thirds. Get daily tips and expert advice to help you take your cooking skills to the next level. Be sure to allow at least one inch of headspace for expansion. You can also use a can of whole or diced tomatoes to make tomato paste. Get easy-to-follow, delicious recipes delivered right to your inbox. We recommend buying the tomato paste in a tube whenever possible since it will keep in the refrigerator for about a month. You can set aside the rest of the purée for another use or freeze for later. Erin Huffstetler is a writer with experience writing about easy ways to save money at home. Whenever you need a small … If you've started a recipe and realized you don't have tomato paste in your pantry or fridge, don't panic. Let it simmer and stir it constantly until it is reduced by half. Blend a 14.5-ounce can of tomatoes in a blender or food processor until smooth. For this method, blend chopped tomatoes in your blender or food processor until they're smooth. Southern-cuisine expert and cookbook author Diana Rattray has created more than 5,000 recipes articles in her 20 years as a food writer. You can also use a can of whole or diced tomatoes to make tomato paste. This should take around 10 minutes and produce about 7 ounces of paste from a 15-ounce can of sauce. Add it to your grocery list and make one of these home substitutions. Canned tomato sauce can be transformed into a substitution for tomato paste in a relatively short amount of time. The average small can of tomato paste is 6 ounces, so make adjustments to fit your recipe. If you have fresh or canned tomatoes, you can use those instead. While homemade tomato paste will capture the incredible flavor of fresh tomatoes and concentrate it for use later, it does take a very long time to make. Essentially, tomato paste is tomato sauce that has been reduced until the liquid boils off and a thick paste is formed. Bring them to a boil, stirring often, but letting them sit and reduce in the pan each time you stir… Therefore, the only ingredient you really need is tomato sauce. Tomato paste is traditionally made from fresh tomatoes that are cooked down for hours. Rather than throw it away, freeze the leftovers so you have paste on hand for the next time you need it. Pour the tomato mixture into a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. It will likely take two or three times as long to reduce, but it will eventually turn into a paste. This should take around 10 minutes and produce about 7 ounces of paste from a 15-ounce can of sauce. For smaller servings, freeze the paste in ice cube trays then transfer them to a plastic freezer bag once frozen. You can also use a larger can of tomato sauce, but you will need to cook the mixture for longer to reduce by at least two-thirds. Tomato Paste Substitute From Tomato Sauce, Tomato Paste Substitute From Canned Tomatoes, 3 Easy Ways to Make Homemade Tomato Paste, How to Make Tomato Sauce From Fresh Tomatoes, What to Use If You Do Not Have Tomato Sauce, 11 Expert Tips on Cooking With Canned Foods. To transform your sauce into a paste, simply heat tomato sauce in a pan. Tomato paste, a thick mixture of puréed tomatoes that is cooked down for hours, adds concentrated flavor to recipes without watering them down. Portion the tomato paste into an ice cube tray (this top-rated silicone ice tray is just $9). Pour a small can (8 ounces) of tomato sauce into a saucepan and bring it to a brisk simmer over medium heat. This is a good idea anyway because you can turn your homegrown tomatoes into both a sauce and a paste and avoid buying those cans at the store. You can also use less of the canned tomatoes to make less tomato paste. If you're feeling ambitious and have an excess of tomatoes, you can make your own and can or freeze any extra for later. The good news is that there may already be a simple solution to your problem in your kitchen. Still on a high heat, add your chopped tomatoes to the skillet, seasoning them with salt to your taste. To transform your sauce into a paste, simply heat tomato sauce in a pan. It can be canned or a fresh tomato sauce you made at home. 11 Expert Tips on Cooking With Canned Food. It's typically sold in small cans or tubes next to the canned tomatoes and is a handy ingredient for soups, stews, sauces, and more. You should get about 2/3 cup or 6 ounces of tomato paste from a 14.5-ounce can of tomatoes. These substitutions will work in a pinch, but you may want to use a little more than the recipe calls for since the flavor won't be quite as concentrated. Real tomato paste is cooked for hours, reducing until it forms a thick, concentrated paste. It's worth noting that whether you make a homemade tomato paste substitution from tomato sauce or canned tomatoes that the results will not be quite as thick as real tomato paste. Continue cooking, stirring constantly, for about 10 minutes, until thickened and reduced by about two-thirds. Depending on the recipe, you may also want to reduce the liquid in the recipe very slightly. That's why most home cooks purchase their tomato paste at the store—it's affordable and has a long shelf-life. It's easy to run out of tomato paste and it always seems to happen right when you need it. There may also be times when you don't have either tomato sauce or paste in the pantry.

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